Assessing Student Learning in Higher Education

   Section 1
 Introduction

Section 2
 
Background and Rationale for Assessment

Section 3
Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs)

Section 4
 Assessment Tools and Data
 Quality Data
 Defining Terms
Assessment Tools
 Grades & Assessment
Primary Trait Analysis
 Rubrics
Selecting the Tools
Creating a Tool
 Quiz
Quiz Answers
 Your SLOs

Section 5
Course Assessment

Section 6
Program Assessment

 

Section 7
Closing the Loop
 

Section 8
Implementing Assessment Training on Campus

 

Section 9
References & Resources


Definitions

Workbook


Using Materials from this Website

 

Quiz Answers on Assessment Tools

1. Where is the best place to examine direct data about student learning?

The classroom or student faculty interface (for student services) is the best place to gather and interpret direct data on learning. As Miller and Wright stated the further from the classroom, the more likely the data is separated from the crucible of learning and the less likely it will result in improvement.

2. List at least three advantages and three disadvantages to using standardized assessment tools. Below are a few examples, there are many more, and varies with the type of assessment.

Advantages Disadvantages
Results can be compared over sections, courses, and institutions Can be expensive
Allows longitudinal comparisons over time Restricted concerning content validity with regards to specific student exposure
Construction and reporting are done by a professional company Provides no feedback profitable to individual student
Administration is easy Usually represents normed data
Prepared by testing experts May reduce assessment of low level cognitive skills through limitations of the instrument
Results can be very reliable Provides only one method of assessment

 

3. List at least three advantages and three disadvantages to using local or homegrown assessment tools. Below are a few examples, there are many more, and varies with the type of assessment.

Advantages Disadvantages
Content validity is usually high with regards to a specific campus or course Reliability may be low
Relevant to student, can be used for feedback and immediate improvement Requires expertise faculty may not have
Students may be invested (if graded) giving a better performance Reporting is not easy to standardize
Flexible assessment measure students with varied ability Usually not comparable across sections, courses, or institutions
Criterion based data Requires time above faculty workload

4. In what way does embedded assessment prompt learning?

Embedded assessment communicates clear expectations and criteria for content and skills. Students will learn based upon the type of expectations they will be tested on. Student learning outcomes cue students about the material and level of learning expected prompting their studying.

5. Match the following characteristics and descriptions of quality data.

Characteristic

 

Definition

a. Valid

 

i. The data are reproducible. Repeated assessment yields the same data.

b. Reliable

 

ii. The data answers important questions, and is not generated simply because it is easy to measure.

c. Authentic

 

iii. The data contributes to improving teaching and learning.

d. Relevant

 

iv. The assessment simulates real-life circumstances.

e. Effective

 

v. The data accurately represents what you are trying to measure.

 

Proceed to Your SLOs and assessment

 

Janet Fulks
Assessing Student Learning in Community Colleges (2004), Bakersfield College
jfulks@bakersfieldcollege.edu    
07/11/2006