Reading Rubrics and Checklists:
Predictions About Characters and Events in a Story Rubric
Rubric for Reader's Response (Retelling)
Reading Scoring Rubric
Draft Response to Literature Rubric
Reading Assessment Rubric
States Main Idea and Gives Supporting Details Rubric
Makes Inferences About Characters and/or Events in a Story Rubric
Summarizes Main Characters, Main Events in Sequence, Setting Rubric
Draws Conclusions From Text Rubric
Multifaceted Reading Rubric
Oral Reading Performance Rubric

Predictions About Characters and Events in a Story Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
No attempt made to respond or response is inappropriate. Fails to make prediction or makes a prediction which is illogical, irrelevant, or unsupported. Makes a prediction about character(s) and/or event(s). Uses few/no details to make the connection between the story and the inference. May use generalities to make the connection between the story and prediction made. Makes a reasonable prediction about character(s) and/or event(s). Uses some details to make the connection between the story and the inference.

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Rubric for Reader's Response (Retelling)

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
The student gives an incomplete retelling that contains no major points or events. Details may be limited. Sequencing of events does not exist. The student's understanding of the main idea is incorrect or makes no sense. The student is unable to make a prediction based on the story. Depending on the selection, a description of the characters or the setting is not included or incorrect. The student's retelling includes at least one major point or event but may focus on a detail or a part of the selection. Student's response does not show an understanding of sequence. The student gives a partial statement of the main idea. The student's prediction is inconsistent with the selection. Depending on the selection, a description of the characters or the setting is included in the retelling. One or the other may be incorrect. The student's retelling may include some details and most major points or events, sequencing them when appropriate. One major point or event is left out. The student gives a simple but acceptable statement of the main idea. The prediction is generally consistent with the selection. Depending on the selection, an incomplete description of the characters and the setting will be included in the retelling. The student uses details and sequence to summarize the selection. The student's retelling includes all major points or events and some relationships between them. The student gives a complete statement of the main idea. The student's prediction is consistent with the selection. The response shows an exceptional understanding of the selection. Depending on the selection, a description of the characters and the setting will add to the completeness of the retelling.

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Reading Scoring Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
*Students performing at this level are literal readers, constructing a plausible but superficial interpretation of a text. They show little sensitivity to nuances and complexities.
* These readers develop few or no connections with or among texts. Sometimes they connect the text associationally with personal experience, but the connection is generally superficial and unexamined.
* At this level readers are not risk takers. They show little tolerance for textual difficulties or lack of closure. Confronted by textual complexity, they are inclined to ignore the difficulties. Their reading process tends not to be recursive: having made some initial sense of the text, they are inclined to retain their view without testing or revising it. * Readers at this level of reading performance rarely challenge the text or carry on an internal dialogue with the writer. If they raise questions at all the questions will be largely unproductive expressions of frustration or low level inquiries (i.e., about word meanings). Any expressed appreciations or criticisms are likely to be simplistic
* Readers at this level construct a thoughtful and plausible interpretation of a text. They fill in some gaps in a text, making assumptions about unstated causes or motivations or drawing meaning from cues in the text. They usually differentiate between literal and figurative meanings. They may recognize real or seeming contradictions, but are sometimes distracted by these contradictions and by ambiguities. They demonstrate their understanding of the whole work.
* Readers achieving this level develop connections within and among texts. They usually connect their understanding of the text to their own experience and knowledge and sometimes to other texts. When directed, these readers may generate, validate, expand and/or reflect on their ideas about the text, but with less depth than in the learned or exemplary level. These readers tend to paraphrase or retell, often thoroughly and purposefully. They also see, however, a more general significance in or wider application of the literal facts of the text.
* These readers, while confident, rarely take risks. They accept the text without exploring multiple possibilities of meaning. They tend to present their understanding of a text as fixed and rarely revise their interpretation as they re-read and as additional information becomes available.
* Readers demonstrating this level of reading performance sometimes challenge or question the text. They may raise questions and may agree or disagree without explaining their reactions.
* A reading performance at this level is discerning, thorough, and perceptive, but will probably show somewhat less insight or sensitivity to nuances and complexities of text than an exemplary reading. These readers are able to fill in gaps in a text, making plausible assumptions from subtle cues; but they engage in these operations with less acuteness of vision than more expert readers. They recognize and differentiate between literal and figurative meanings. They recognize real or seeming contradictions, exploring possibilities for their resolution or tolerating ambiguities. They demonstrate their understanding of the whole work as well as an awareness of how the parts work together to create the whole.
* These readers may explore multiple possibilities of meaning. While they may form firm interpretations early in their reading, they are open to revising their ideas as additional information or insight becomes available to them. They sometimes articulate newly developed levels of understanding.
* Readers at this level challenge the text. They pose questions, postulate answers, take exception, agree, disagree, speculate; however, the questions and/or issues they raise may not be as insightful or perceptive as those of the reader demonstrating an exemplary reading.
* An exemplary reading performance is insightful, discerning, and perceptive as the reader constructs and reflects on meaning in a text. Readers at this level are sensitive to linguistic, structural, cultural, and psychological nuances and complexities. They fill in gaps in a text, making plausible assumptions about unstated causes or motivations, or drawing meaning from subtle cues. They differentiate between literal and figurative meanings. They recognize real or seeming contradictions, exploring possibilities for their resolution or tolerating ambiguities. They demonstrate their understanding of the whole work as well as an awareness of how the parts work together to create the whole.
* Readers achieving this level develop connections with and among texts. They connect their understanding of the text not only to their own ideas, experience and knowledge, but to their history as participants in a culture or larger community, often making connections to other texts or other works of art. Exceptional readers draw on evidence from the text to generate, validate, expand, and reflect on their own ideas.
* These readers take risks. They entertain challenging ideas and explore multiple possibilities of meaning as they read, grounding these meanings in their acute perceptions of textual and cultural complexities. They often revise their understanding of a text as they re-read and as additional information or insight becomes available to them. They sometimes articulate a newly developed level of understanding.
* Readers demonstrating this level of performance challenge the text. They carry on an internal dialogue with the writer, raising questions, taking exception, agreeing, disagreeing, appreciating or objecting to text features. They may test the validity of the author's ideas, information, and/or logic by considering the authority of the author and the nature and quality of the author's source(s). They frequently suggest ways of rewriting the text, speculating about the ideology or cultural or historical biases that seem to inform a text, speculating about the ideology or cultural or historical biases that seem to inform a text, sometimes recognizing and embracing and sometimes resisting the ideological position that a text seems to construct for its reader.

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Draft Response to Literature Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
* Response does not indicate understanding of selection.
* No predictions consistent with selection.
* Retelling incomplete with no major events.
* Details limited in summary and not in sequence.
* No statement of main idea or statement makes no sense.
* Description of characters and setting incorrect or not included.
* Response shows partial understanding of selection.
* Prediction inconsistent with selection.
* Retelling includes at least one major event.
* May focus on one detail or part of selection.
* Does not show understanding of sequence.
* Partial statement of main idea.
* Description of character or setting is incorrect.
* Response shows good understanding of selection.
* Prediction is generally consistent with selection.
* Retelling includes major events.
* Uses some details in sequence to summarize.
* Simple statement of main idea.
* Description of character and setting mostly complete.
* Statement of conflict or problem is vague.
* Response shows exceptional understanding of selection.
* Prediction consistent with selection.
* Retelling includes all major events.
* Uses important details in sequence to summarize.
* Complete statements of main idea.
* Description of characters and main setting accurate.
* States problem or conflict clearly.

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Reading Assessment Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
* Depends heavily on phonetic cues.
* Lacks expression and fluency.
* Reads slowly orally and silently.
* Doesn't use context to attack unknown words.
* Reads word by word.
* Won't take risks.
* Does not comprehend main idea.
* Is easily distracted during reading time.
* Perceives reading as painful and time-consuming.
* Tends to choose short, easy, familiar books.
* Often needs encouragement to read.
* May ignore punctuation when reading aloud.
* May be distracted by irrelevant details.
* Shares feelings about stories with encouragement.
* Knows limited number of authors
* Remembers books, characters and settings.
* Uses a variety of strategies to deal with difficult words.
* Shares information and feelings about stories spontaneously.
* Raises questions.
* Reads at varying rates depending on purpose and encouragement.
* Retells accurately but may not filter out irrelevant details.
* Recommends books to peers.
* Recognizes author's style
* Reaches out to challenging books within reach.
* Appreciates humour.
* Reads widely; knows authors, styles.
* Remembers books, characters, settings.
* Savours language.
* Reads aloud fluently and effortlessly.
* Summarizes and interprets story effectively.
* Raises unique questions.

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States Main Idea and Gives Supporting Details Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Attempts to identify the main idea(s); however, the main idea may be stated incorrectly or may be missing. May contain few, incorrect, or irrelevant details. Identifies the main idea(s), and includes some supporting details. Much of the response is copied directly from the text. May contain major inaccuracies. Identifies the main idea(s) correctly, and includes many supporting details. Response is written mostly in the student’s own words. May contain minor inaccuracies. Clearly and accurately identifies the main idea(s), and includes most of the relevant supporting details. Response is written in the student’s own words.

This Rubric may be used as a listening rubric.

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Makes Inferences About Characters and/or Events in a Story Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Fails to make an inference, or makes an inference which is illogical or irrelevant. Makes a general inference about character(s) and/or event(s) with few/no supporting details, or uses irrelevant details. Makes a general inference about character(s) and/or event(s) with some supporting details, or uses irrelevant details. Makes logical and relevant inferences about character(s) and/or event(s). Details from the story support the inferences made.

This rubric may also be used as a listening rubric.

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Summarizes Main Characters, Main Events in Sequence, Setting Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Unable to adequately summarize events, most of the main characters, and the setting (major flaws). Summarizes most of the events, most of the main characters, and the setting (major flaws). Summarizes the main events, the main characters, and the setting (minor flaws) Accurately and completely summarizes the main events in correct sequence, the main characters, and the setting.

This rubric may also be used as a listening rubric.

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Draws Conclusions From Text Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Fails to draw a conclusion (may give a summary instead). Draws a conclusion but conclusion is unsupported, illogical, or irrelevant. Draws a conclusion, and uses a few supporting details from the text. Draws logical and relevant conclusion(s) and uses supporting details from the text.

This rubric may also be used as a listening rubric.

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Multifaceted Reading Rubric

 
Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Constructing Meaning The response demonstrates little evidence of constructing meaning from the text. The response:
* Attends to minor details of the text, or may recopy verbatim passages.
* Is likely to be inaccurate, incomplete, irrelevant, or incoherent.
* May be sketchy, fragmented or may show a serious misunderstanding of the text.
* Does not take into account the functions of print conventions and text structures or genres.
The response demonstrates an adequate understanding of the gist of the text. The response:
* Provides a solid summary of the text.
* Tends to focus on literal understandings but may include some evidence of inferential or evaluative comprehension.
* Shows little evidence that the reader has actively used background knowledge. Interpretations tend to be somewhat flat.
* Seldom explores meanings of individual words, nuances of meaning or figurative meanings.
The response demonstrates good understanding of the text. The response:
* Provides a solid summary of the text.
* Provides inferential and evaluative comprehension.
* Shows evidence that the reader has used background knowledge.
* Provides good interpretations of the text.
* Points out some figurative meanings in the text.
Responses are complex and demonstrate a thorough understanding and interpretation of the text. The response:
* Shows evidence of comprehension on many levels (e.g., literal, inferential, evaluative.)
* Uses the reader's background knowledge and experience to enrich the understanding of the new text.
* May display knowledge about the functions of print conventions in interpretations of text.
* May display understanding of text structures and genres.
* May demonstrate sensitivity to word meanings by focusing on specific words and elaborating or speculating about origins, nuances, or figurative meanings.
Connections Within Text The response may demonstrate some understanding of discrete parts of the text or may focus solely on a single aspect or section. The response:
* Focuses on isolated facts and does not connect text elements.
* Lacks awareness of the author's style or craft as a unifying presence in the selection.
* May present no information from the passage, or may briefly mention only the topic or some key words from a section of the passage.
The response clarifies and explains the relationships of all the parts of the text; however, the ability to integrate all the parts into a complete whole may be lacking. The response:
* May include some retelling or summarizing which is more complete in some sections and may contain some inaccuracies of lack of coherence in other sections.
* Does not attempt to clarify or explain inconsistencies within the text or within the interpretation. Contradictions are tolerated rather than explained.
The response clarifies and explains the relationships of all the parts of the text; but interpretations may be lacking in complexity. The response:
* May include some retelling or summarizing but focuses more on interacting with the text to interpret the connections among the different parts of the text.
* Attempts to clarify or explain inconsistencies within the text or interpretation but lacks complexity in such.
The response reveals complex interpretations of the text by making connections among different parts of the text. The response:
* Shows rich, complex integration of understanding through ongoing, recurring interactions with the text.
* May elaborate on or explain issues or contradictions within the text.
* Shows understanding of the relationship of parts of the text to the integrity of the whole selection.
* Shows evidence of "reading like a writer" - – analyzing, evaluating, or appreciating the author’s perspective and craft.
Extending Beyond Text The response does not make extensions to other texts, relevant personal experiences which extend understanding, or abstractions or generalizations. The response:
* Is typically text-bound and lacks extensions which foster deeper understanding.
* May refer to personal experiences, but often is tangential rather than integral to the reading.
* May reflect an attempt to tell about something read or viewed, not directly related to the passage.
* May contain vague abstractions or generalizations or none at all.
The response may demonstrate some personal connection to the text, but references are general rather than precise and often reflect the ordinary rather than the unique. The response:
* Personal involvement is somewhat superficial or occurs as an afterthought rather than an inherent part of the interaction with the text.
* May express opinions, judgments or insights about the content of the text but does not extend these to abstract or general concepts.
* May refer to other texts but may reflect the mundane and obvious.
The response demonstrates some evidence of extension beyond the text to other texts, experiences, abstractions and/or generalizations, but focuses more on personal experience than anything else. The response:
* Draws somewhat on other texts for deeper understanding, but focuses more on personal experience which may be limited.
* May express opinions, judgments, or insights about the content of the text and may extend these to abstract or general concepts.
The response demonstrates considerable evidence of extension beyond the text to other texts, experiences, abstractions and/or generalizations. The response:
* Draws on personal experiences to assist in clarifying and elaborating issues beyond test-bound concerns.
* Shows precise and insightful connections to other texts, reflecting deeper understanding.
* Draws conclusions about abstractions or generalizations which show a complex understanding of the text and an awareness of interactions beyond the text.
* Reflects a strong personal involvement through comparison/ contrast to other texts and experiences.
* May contain expressions of curiosity, wonder or desire to learn more about something in or related to the text
Risk-Taking The response reflects a safe, text-bound interpretation and does not take risks. The response:
* Generally accepts the writer's absolute authority.
* Focuses on a single "correct" interpretation, often relying on verbatim phrases from the text.
* Reveals reading difficulties and lacks evidence of strategies to overcome them.
* Lacks personal insights or contains irrelevant ideas.
* Lacks awareness of the author's voice.
The response may exhibit some risk-taking but generally regards the author and the text as authoritative. The response:
* May attempt an alternative interpretation, but focuses more on arriving at the "right"” interpretation.
* May contain personal insights connected, more often, to prior knowledge rather than to newly discovered understanding.
* May challenge author’s knowledge, claims or style, but is tentative.
* May reveal reading obstacles and difficulties, sometimes with a sense of the reader’s frustration.
* Expresses confidence about reading of “easy” passages.
The response exhibits some risk-taking and questioning of authorial authority, but is limited in alternative interpretations and insights. The response:
* Attempts to question authorial authority but interpretations and insights are of a literal understanding and lacking in depth.
The response demonstrates evidence of behaviours such as questioning authorial authority, creating alternative interpretations, or discovering personal insights. The response:
* Reflects pride and confidence in reading ability; the reader appears "in charge" of own literacy.
* May suggest more than one interpretation or develop an alternative interpretation, supported with relevant textual information.
* May thoughtfully support or challenge author's assumptions, perspective, claims or style.
* Expresses opinions, judgments and personal insights about the text.
* May contain evidence of persistence with reading task and use of strategies to overcome obstacles or difficulties.

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Oral Reading Performance Rubric

Apprentice
Basic
Learned
Exemplary
Read word by word and must be assisted with many words.

Meaning is lost in the difficulty with the words.

Reads word by word with no logical grouping.

Speaks in a monotone, with little change in pace or voice inflection.

Speaks too softly to be heard by all in audience.

Slurs and mumbles words.

Usually groups words in a logical manner.

Uneven emphasis given to important content.

Tone and pace follow text punctuation fairly well.

Loudness of voice varies.

Mispronounces some words.

Groups words logically when reading aloud.

Changes voice tone to emphasize important content.

Alters voice and pace in accordance with text punctuation.

Can be heard by all in audience.

Enunciates each word clearly.


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